Me and Mr. Eggleston (and our tricycles)

I can swear and, I believe, you are capable of not believing that in 2018 in Paranapiacaba (SP-Brazil) I took this photograph of the top of the diptych I was already aware of this iconic photo by William Eggleston (which is mentioned in the literature as “Untitled, Tricycle and Memphis, 1970”), but I did not imagine that today I would be comparing mine with his made practically from the same angle.

Observing international criticism, this lower angle gives Eggleston’s famous photo very inspired considerations like this one by Mark Feeney: “Looking up at the sky, Eggleston’s camera gives that tricycle the majesty – and ineffability – of an archangel’s throne” (William Eggleston’s Big Wheels, Smithsonian Magazine – August 2011). Feeney also notes that Eggleston’s tricycle dominates the foreground of the photo “like a chariot of very youthful gods“. And he adds: “archangels, deities: for Eggleston, the profane is what’s sacred”.

“My tricycle”. Paranapiacaba (SP), Brazil. 2018.
William Eggleston’s Tricycle. Menphis, USA. 1970.

You who are reading this text what about my tricycle? I hope you say good things since my tricycle is at a great disadvantage – to say the least – to Eggleston made in 1970. This iconic photograph was recently auctioned for just over half a million US dollars. I would be happy with good readings from my tricycle and, perhaps, a very minimal fraction – a very tinny fraction – of Eggleston’s dollars for my tricycle.

Do you want to buy it?

Why I love William Christenberry’s photographic work

I don’t know if you, like me, are fans of photography work by Stephen Shore (born 1947 in New York-USA), an American photographer famous for his photographs – as many critics say – “of objects, everyday scenes or banal, and for pioneering the use of color in artistic photography “. Without a doubt, Stephen Shore’s photographic work is really very good. But (perhaps motivated by my personal identification with the photography theme) – and as there is always a ‘but’ in life – there is in my opinion, another photographer, also American, who is also considered the pioneer of worldwide color photography called William Christenberry (born on 1936 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama and died on 2016 in Washington, DC-USA). In my opinion – that coincides with that of a large number of critics – Christenberry is as well a great master in color photography.(texto em português ao final) Read More

The Blue World

“The world is blue at its edges and in its depth…For many years, I have been moved by the blues at the far edge of what can be seen, that color of horizon, of remote mountain ranges, of anything far away. The color of that distance is the color of an emotion, the color of solitude and of desire, the color of there seen from here, the color of where you are not. And the color of where you can never go. For the blue is not the place those miles away at the horizon…Blue is the color of longing for the distances you never arrive in, for the blue world.” (Lisa Elmalech) Read More